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2015 Western Australian Heritage Awards finalists

43 heritage champions, across eight categories, have been named as finalists in the 2015 Western Australian Heritage Awards. A summary of each of the finalists is below. To view the images in a larger format, simply click on the image thumbnail.

The winners will be announced on Wednesday 15 April at the WA Museum's Hackett Hall.

Read the Minister's media statement here.



Voluntary individual contribution

 Image of Norma Andrews
Ms Norma Andrews

Ms Andrews restored the last vestiges of the once thriving Quindalup timber town from a derelict state into a successful café and tourist attraction. The Slab Cottage Group, now known as Harwoods Cottage, comprises a group of buildings constructed in the 1860s. Now a café, the cottage is rare for its intact split slab construction. The government building operated as the district’s post office and telephone exchange from 1923 to 1966.

The successfully restoration is the culmination of a 20 year dream of Mrs Andrews when she inherited the property in 1988. Through her tireless efforts and a dedicated approach to conservation, these important buildings are now being enjoyed by countless local, national and international visitors.


 Image of Mr Laurie Ayers Mr Laurie Ayers

Mr Laurie Ayers has been the owner and manager of the Classic Federation-style Recreation Hotel in Boulder since 1989. After an earthquake severely damaged the hotel in 2010, Mr Ayers invested a significant amount of energy and money into restoring the building to its former glory including fully repointing the stonework and tuck-pointing the brickwork.

Mr Ayers believes that as the owner of the hotel, he is a ‘custodian’ of this heritage building and works to preserve it for future generations. The restoration of the Recreation Hotel has enhanced the nearby Burt Street heritage precinct and contributed to sustainable heritage tourism in the region.

Mr Ayers became a city of Kalgoorlie-Boulder Councillor in 2009 after recognising a need for representation in the areas of heritage and tourism. Through his work as a councillor and on many community boards and committees he has passionately promoted heritage tourism in the Goldfields.

 Image of Dr Howard Gray Dr Howard Gray

Dr Howard Gray’s research and writing has made an outstanding contribution to the understanding, promotion and celebration of Western Australia’s maritime heritage. In 1993, Dr Gray helped establish the Batavia Coast Maritime Heritage Association. He has served as a board member of the Abrolhos Islands Consultative Council, the HMAS Sydney II Memorial Advisory Committee and the Australian Association for Maritime History and in executive roles with the Batavia Coast Maritime Heritage Association.

Dr Gray has published numerous award-winning books that engage a diverse range of audiences and coordinated a series of events to mark the 50th anniversary of the identification of the Batavia wreck site.

 Image of Mr Peter Snow Mr Peter Snow

Mr Peter Snow co-founded The Jaycees Community Foundation in 1976 to enable the State chapters of the foundation to undertake major community projects too large for the individual Jaycee Chapters.

In 1980, the Jaycee Foundation acquired Australia’s last whaling station at Cheynes Beach, Albany. In the ensuing 25 years, the foundation, with Peter Snow as its non-executive Chairman until 2004, and in the years following acting as Executive Chairman, has transformed this whaling station into an internationally significant and multi-award winning regional heritage tourism icon.

Mr Snow’s vision and drive has transformed a derelict whaling station into a unique heritage tourism operation. Discovery Bay Historic Whaling Station delivers an authentic experience that allows visitors to absorb the history of the site, and consider it against contemporary values.

Professional contribution

 Image of Mr Martin Colgan Mr Martin Colgan

From humble stone masonry beginnings, Martin Colgan has built-up a highly respected and multi-disciplinary family building company dedicated to conserving, restoring and adapting heritage buildings.

Over the past 40 years, he has worked on numerous landmark heritage buildings including Wesley Church, Government House, St Brigid’s Old School, Fremantle’s Roundhouse, Fremantle Prison, and St George’s Cathedral.

He and his wife also worked with the Aboriginal community to restore the fragile Beagle Bay Mission Church on the Dampier Peninsular. The project won the 2011 Western Australian Heritage Award for conservation.

Mr Colgan has passed his passion for heritage onto his sons who are now involved in the business, Colgan Industries. In 2012, their successful adaptation of the former Mackays Aerated Waters Factory (1928) into a complex that now incorporates 37 apartments, an office and a retail outlet received the WA Heritage Award for adaptive reuse as well as Master Builders Association and Housing Association Greening Award.

 Image of Mr Ian Hocking Mr Ian Hocking

The late Ian Hocking made a significant contribution to the development of heritage practice in Western Australia. His passion for heritage places and the stories they tell about the community was teamed with a deep understanding of the built environment.

Mr Hocking established his own architecture practice in 1986 where, as principal, he immersed himself in all aspects of building design and construction. Over his career, he received many awards and peer recognition, including the Architects Board of Western Australia’s Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Architectural Profession.

Ian regularly contributed to community groups and engaged in debate on current heritage issues, furthering a broader community understanding of heritage. He worked tirelessly to develop his knowledge of heritage theory and practice and was generous in sharing his accumulated knowledge and experience.

 Image of Mr Tom Perrigo Mr Tom Perrigo

In 1990, Tom Perrigo was appointed Chief Executive Officer of the National Trust of Australia (WA), a position he still holds today. Over the past 25 years, Mr Perrigo has demonstrated outstanding professional and personal commitment to heritage in WA. Under his leadership, the National Trust has grown to be a leading organisation in heritage and made an outstanding contribution to the conservation and promotion of the State’s heritage.

Under Mr Perrigo’s leadership, the National Trust has executed many successful heritage projects in WA, including Wanslea, 57 Murray Street and Stirling House, all excellent examples that have resulted in strong heritage outcomes.

Mr Perrigo has been actively involved in volunteer and board positions in WA for many years. He has been a member of the judging panel for the WA Tourism Awards, is a member of the International Council for Monuments and Sites, and was last year named the Inaugural Patron of Trails WA.

 Image of Dr John Taylor Dr John Taylor

Dr John Taylor established his architectural and conservation practice in 1990, and in the course of the 25 years of his practice, John has made an exceptional contribution to the heritage of the built environment in Western Australia. He has demonstrated conservation best practice through a meticulous and cautious approach, academic rigour and highly skilled technical expertise.

Dr John Taylor is one of only a few architects in Australia to possess formal training and qualifications in heritage work. His professionalism and skills are well recognised at local, national and international levels and his projects consistently received accolades at the AIA Architecture Awards in the Heritage Conservation category. In 2014, his overseeing of the restoration of Cape Inscription Lighthouse Keepers’ Quarters in Shark Bay won both a WA heritage Award and a UNESCO Asia-Pacific Award for Cultural Heritage Conservation.

Notable projects John Taylor has been involved in include St Francis Xavier Cathedral, Geraldton, St Brigid’s Convent, Northbridge and the Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Mullewa.

 Image of Mr Malcolm Traill Mr Malcolm Traill

Mr Malcolm Traill believes that the key to conserving our State’s heritage is to encourage broad community appreciation, understanding and knowledge of heritage values. As Public Programs Officer at the Western Australian Museum, Albany, Mr Traill has achieved this by encouraging both the local community and visitors to the region to participate in the museum’s programs, activities and events.

Mr Traill developed and implemented the ‘Tuesday Curatorial’ program that explores a different aspect of Albany’s heritage each week. This popular program draws an enthusiastic crowd of between 80 to 120 participants, engages community members of all ages with local heritage and ensures heritage advocates for generations to come.

Community-based organisation


 Image of conserved ruins at Macpherson Home Carnamah Historical Society and Museum

The Carnamah Historical Society and Museum, in WA's Mid West, works to actively conserve, document and promote local heritage. The Carnamah Historical Society restored State Registered Macpherson Homestead, which is now open to visitors. It also established and operates the Carnamah Museum. The society shares and promotes local heritage online, contributes to the professional development of the heritage sector, and actively works in partnership with local government, other heritage organisations, community organisations and State Government.

In 2014, the society launched a biographical dictionary, rolled out a series of new education resources and engaged thousands of virtual volunteers. Its work was recognised with a Museums and Galleries National Award.

 Image of members of the Guildford Association planting  a tree Guildford Association

Since its establishment in 1975, the Guildford Association (GA) has been involved in conserving and maintaining the heritage of Guildford. The association holds regular meetings and events with a historical focus, and recently coordinated leadlight walks to showcase the character and features of Guildford’s houses. Other events hosted by the association include walking tours of Guildford’s historic and natural environment, monthly talks for members and the annual Guildford Association Garden Party.

The association has implemented two recent conservation projects in Guildford, including the conservation of the Manettii Roses by Barker’s Bridge and the restoration of Stirling Gates within the City of Swan.

The association is committed to its role as caretakers of Guildford’s heritage.


 Image of the members of the Historical Society of Cockburn Historical Society of Cockburn

The Historical Society of Cockburn is a not-for-profit organisation made up of volunteers who are the dedicated custodians and curators of the Azelia Ley Museum complex. The 30 active members open the museum regularly, giving the general public, tourists and school groups the opportunity to see restored working displays of old machinery. All members of the society are actively engaged in collecting, acquiring, renovating, conserving, archiving, interpreting and exhibiting artefacts donated by the public.

The society works closely with the City of Cockburn on conserving local heritage assets and has prepared a treatment plan for Davilak House and Archaeological Ruins. It hosted the 2009 Royal Australian Historical Society Conference and coordinated heritage projects such as the local Pioneer Names Board, an annual Vintage Machinery Festival Day and Anzac Centennial commemorations.

 Image of the board of the Jaycees Community Foundation Inc Jaycees Community Foundation Inc

The Jaycees Community Foundation was founded in 1976 to enable the State chapters of the foundation to undertake major community projects too large for the individual Jaycee Chapters.

The foundation is an innovative community organisation in Western Australia that works to create opportunities and leadership training for young people through community involvement.

In 1980, the Jaycee Foundation acquired Australia’s last whaling station in Cheynes Beach, Albany. Over the following 25 years, the foundation has transformed this whaling station into an internationally significant and multi-award winning regional heritage tourism destination. In that time, it has attracted more than 2 million visitors and generated approximately $40 million in the local economy. The project is to become the foundation's ultimate ‘gift’ to the Albany community.

 Image of a Kalamunda and Districts Historical Society event Kalamunda and Districts Historical Society

Kalamunda and Districts Historical Society was formed in 1969 with a founding goal of establishing a local museum on a suitable site. The museum opened two years later at the historic Kalamunda Railway Station and Yard of the former Upper Darling Range Railway. In the same year, the society also took over the restoration and management of Stirk Cottage, the first residence in the Kalamunda town site.

The society works to research, collect and preserve the history of Kalamunda and Districts and to share this knowledge with the wider community. There is a strong heritage education aspect to the museum with more than 6,000 students visiting each year. The museum is also a valuable cultural tourism attraction, drawing more than 12,000 visitors in 2014.

 Images of Maritime Archaelogical Association of WA divers Maritime Archaeological Association of WA

The Maritime Archaeological Association of WA (MAAWA) is a group of divers and historians interested in WA’s rich maritime heritage. The association was established in 1974 and is closely affiliated with the WA Maritime Museum.

The association aims to research and record WA maritime heritage and make it accessible to the public. To this end, the association launched ‘Shipwrecks of WA’, a smart phone app and website in October 2014. This app makes available the Database of Shipwrecks that contains more than 40 years of research by MAAWA members to divers and history enthusiasts.

The association has future plans to expand the app to include data on more of the State’s coast and to include new technologies such as 3D modelling and footage of important shipwrecks.

 Image of a photographic display by the Mount Lawley Society Mount Lawley Society

Mount Lawley Society (MLS) is a community organisation, founded in 1977, to promote heritage, local history, education and community spirit in the heritage suburbs of Mount Lawley, Menora and Inglewood.

The MLS’s vision is to preserve the history of the area and share this information with the broader community through photographs, displays and exhibitions, and to allow residents in these heritage suburbs to interact both socially and formally.

The not-for-profit society holds functions for its members and the public throughout the year including popular heritage walks that showcase architectural styles. The organisation produces a quarterly newsletter for its members and holds annual garden competitions. The society also puts together displays of historical information and photographs at events such as the Beaufort Street Festival.

 Image of a Barn Art Exhibition held by Slater Homestead Group Slater  Homestead Group Advisory Body to the Shire of Goomalling

The historic Slater Homestead was purchased for the community by the Shire of Goomalling in 2000. At that time, the precinct was in a state of disrepair. A small community group, the Slater Homestead Group Advisory Body was formed to develop and promote Slater Homestead.

The Slater Homestead Group currently has six members, all of whom have shown extraordinary commitment. The group opens the precinct to the public from 10am–4pm on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, from March to November each year. To complement the heritage tourism experience and encourage repeat visits, the group also runs a tea room that offers home-cooked refreshment. All proceeds from the tea room are channelled back into the homestead project to improve the visitor experience.

The hard work of the advisory body has shaped this great example of early European settlement of the Wheatbelt into the successful heritage tourism destination it is today.

public or private organisation


 Image of the restored Burt Streetscape in the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder for the Burt Street Heritage Precinct

Located in the heart of the Goldfields-Esperance region, the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder is Australia's largest outback city. The city, an amalgamation of the towns of Kalgoorlie and Boulder, was settled after the discovery of gold in 1893. It recognises that heritage is its past, present and future and that it provides a sense of place and time, identifiable landmarks and a sense of belonging.

The Burt Street heritage precinct restoration is a major project of the city’s that aims to return Burt Street in Boulder to its early 1900s appearance. Verandahs, facades and parapets of privatel-owned properties along Burt Street will be restored with the aim of re-establishing a vibrant town centre that speaks of its gold rush past.

 An image of conservation work on the interior of St George's Cathedral Perth by Colgan Industries Colgan Industries

Colgan Industries is a family-owned building and development business based in Perth. The company has been in the construction business for more than 40 years, with the last 30 years specialising in heritage restoration.

The company is well known for its work with heritage buildings in Perth, including St George’s Cathedral, Archbishop’s Place, Fremantle Train Station, Fremantle Prison and the Timekeeper’s Hut at the Midland Railway Workshops.

Colgan Industries received the Excellence in Adaptive Reuse: The Gerry Gauntlett Award at the 2012 WA Heritage Awards for its work on the adaptation of the former Mackays Aerated Waters Factory (1928) into a complex that now incorporates 37 apartments, an office and a retail outlet that preserves, enhances and interprets the industrial heritage of the site.

 Image of Heritage Perth walking tour at Governemnt House Heritage Perth

Through its innovative projects and programs, Heritage Perth has carved itself a niche position in Perth’s heritage scene. Rather than duplicate services offered by other heritage organisations, Heritage Perth aims to complement them with an unconventional and approachable method of community engagement while communicating the important messages about heritage conservation and protection.

In just six years, ‘Perth Heritage Days’ has become Heritage Perth’s flagship event. This annual event now attracts more than 40,000 participants each year and provides a wonderful opportunity to explore Perth’s heritage.

Heritage Perth has shone a spotlight on our city's heritage, helping to make it educational, inclusive, valued, interesting and fun. By encouraging a better understanding of Perth’s heritage sites, Heritage Perth is helping to ensure a secure future for them.

heritage practices by a local government


 Image of people dancing at Vancouver Street Festival in the City of Albany City of Albany

Protection of Albany’s unique cultural heritage is a key part of the City of Albany’s Community Strategic Plan. The city aims to lead by example and has committed considerable resources to the maintenance and enhancement of its heritage assets and streetscapes.

As the earliest permanently settled town in Western Australia, Albany has claim to an extensive historical legacy dating from early European settlement of the State. Drawing on this, the City of Albany actively promotes its heritage as a point of difference in the growing heritage tourism market.

The City of Albany worked closely with the owners of 12 heritage buildings within the Stirling Terrace Precinct to help them secure funds to undertake conservation works in time for the Anzac Centenary Commemorations. The city supported their applications for Heritage Council grants and then expediting the development applications to enable conservation works to be completed in time.

 Image of Restoration of Little Boulder Sweet Shop in the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder

Located in the heart of the Goldfields-Esperance region, the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder is Australia's largest outback city. The city, an amalgamation of the towns of Kalgoorlie and Boulder, was settled after the discovery of gold in 1893. It recognises that heritage is its past, present and future and that it provides a sense of place and time, identifiable landmarks and a sense of belonging.

The City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder administers a comprehensive program of heritage initiatives including policies, grants and incentives to assist owners in the conservation of the city's heritage. The city's History and Heritage Unit maintains an extensive archive of local and family history records as well as the Goldfields War Museum collection.

 Image Northam Town Hall in the Shire of Northam Shire of Northam

The Shire of Northam aims to retain, preserve, protect and enhance heritage buildings and objects of heritage value, historic interest, natural beauty or scientific interest wherever possible.

Northam has the third highest number of places listed in the State Register of Heritage Places, with 28 places now on the register, after the recent additions of Fermoy House, the former Northam Girl’s School and the former Northam Fire Station.

The shire’s motto ‘Heritage, Commerce and Lifestyle’, reflects how highly the shire values heritage and its commitment to identifying and conserving key heritage assets. The shire allocates a proportion of its budget to promoting heritage tourism, heritage-based training for staff and reviewing its Municipal Heritage Inventory.

interpretation project


 Image of Albany Forts (Princess Royal Fortress) Interpretation project Albany Forts (Princess Royal Fortress)

The Princess Royal Fortress underwent a major upgrade in preparation for the Anzac Centenary Commemorations. The City of Albany’s vision for the refurbishment of the forts was to develop a series of spaces that were symbolic, functional, contributed to the commemoration of the Anzac journey and would serve as a gateway to the National Anzac Centre.

Diverse professionals in heritage, curation, museums, economic development and landscape architecture were brought together in this project. The site refurbishment involved the establishment of the National Anzac Centre, enhancement of the public event space, convoy lookout and walk, as well as a restaurant and retail space.

The forts upgrade has significantly enhanced and revitalised the site as a leading heritage tourism precinct, recasting its place as a significant heritage place that poignantly articulates the Anzac story.

 Images of visitors at Discovery Bay's Historic Whaling Station Panorama Tower Gallery Discovery Bay's Historic Whaling Station

Discovery Bay's Historic Whaling Station in Albany was home to the Cheynes Beach Whaling Company between 1952 and 1978. It tells the story of commercial whaling and gives visitors an insight into what it was like to work there at the height of the whaling industry.

The Jaycees Community Foundation has transformed the whaling station into an internationally significant and multi award-winning regional heritage tourism destination. The station has attracted more than 2 million visitors and generated more than $40 million in the local economy.

For broad appeal, the project employs varying technologies and uses converted buildings and whale oil tanks, to innovatively present the history of Australia’s first industry. It is now part of a larger tourism precinct incorporating natural heritage.

 Image of the Esperance Foreshore interpretation project Esperance Foreshore Interpretation Project

In 2001, the Shire of Esperance began the planning of a major upgrade of the town site shoreline and adjacent foreshore from which the State Registered Tanker Jetty extends. Creative Spaces, a multidisciplinary design studio, was engaged in 2014 to ensure the development of Tanker Jetty and its history was captured and retold in a way to enrich visitor experience.

Creative Spaces researched, designed and installed interpretive signage, panels and sculptures which enhance the stories, as set out in the interpretation.

The interpretation is also part of a broader redevelopment plan for the Esperance foreshore that includes landscaping, recreational facilities, and renewal of the jetty services.

 Images of projections as part of hiLIGHTS - celebrating 125 years of the State Library of WA hiLIGHTS - celebrating 125 years of the State Library of Western Australia

The State Library of WA plays a significant role in the collection of the State’s history, education of children, championship of literacy and learning, and in the inspiration and fostering of creative ideas. 2014 marked the 125th anniversary of the State Library of WA.

The hiLIGHTS projection project was a curated collage of images and sounds drawn from the library’s digitised collections which explored Western Australia’s changing landscapes, people, culture and the story of the State Library over its 125 year history.

Visual projection artist Roly Skender and musician Cathie Travers collaborated to turn the State Library of Western Australia inside out, bringing digitised material into the public arena. Projected onto the walls of the State Library building on 6 December 2014, the event attracted a crowd of more than 2,000 people. The project was made available online and has since been seen by thousands more.

 Image of Old Port at Arthur Head Reserve Old Port at Arthur Head Reserve

Fremantle’s Old Port is located within the nationally-recognised heritage reserve of Arthur Head, where the first European settlers landed on the west coast of Australia on 2 May 1829. Architect firm Donaldson and Warn was commissioned to rejuvenate the area by improving public amenity and foregrounding the location’s historical significance.

The Old Port interpretative design better reveals relationships between the building structures (including the original sea wall), topography and coastal vegetation. Public amenity is improved with a larger lawn area, the transplanting of mature pine trees, lighting, rolling seats on rail tracks, benches and signage intended to spark the imagination. The formerly dilapidated site is now a popular space that provides greater public amenity. The overall design, including signage that speaks to the site’s history, highlights the heritage and cultural significance of the place.

 Image of interpretive panel at the Old Railway Station, Geraldton Original Railway Station, Geraldton

Geraldton’s Original Railway Station is a highly valued landmark heritage building that contributes to the local community’s sense of place and history. Opened in 1878, the building was the first government railway station to be built in Western Australia. After the Railway Station was relocated, the building functioned as a Mechanic’s Institute, Public Library and the Geraldton Regional Museum. After the building was vacated by the WA Museum in 2000, it gradually fell into disrepair.

The City of Greater Geraldton undertook a full refurbishment of the building, which was adapted to accommodate the Visitor Centre. The restoration of the station has resulted in an abandoned and derelict building being transformed into a thriving centre for tourism, while retaining its original character and appeal. The interpretation aspect of the refurbishment tells the story of the building's rich heritage by employing a range of mediums which transport both visitors and local residents to times past.

 Image from Shipwrecks WA - app and website Shipwrecks of Western Australia, a smart phone app and website

The Maritime Archaeological Association of WA (MAAWA) is a group of divers and historians interested in WA’s rich maritime heritage. The association is closely affiliated with the WA Maritime Museum and was formed in 1974.

The association launched ‘Shipwrecks of WA’, a smart phone app and website in October 2014. The app and website allows the public to learn about the many registered shipwrecks in WA waters and will benefit tourists, pedestrians, boat users, divers and snorkelers. ‘Shipwrecks of WA’ lists pictures and maps of shipwreck sites off the WA coast, Rottnest Island and the Swan River. The app brings 40 years of dedicated research by MAAWA members out of files and boxes and makes it directly accessible to the public.

 Interpretation at Peninsula Farm (Tranby House) Tranby House (Peninsula Farm)

Peninsula Farm is a historic farmer’s cottage on Johnson Road, Maylands, Western Australia. Overlooking the Swan River, it is significant as one of the oldest surviving buildings from the early settlement of the Swan River Colony. The newly-installed interpretation at Peninsula Farm is designed to provide visitor orientation to the place. This carefully considered interpretation illustrates the personal experience, expectations and hardship of early colonisation, voiced through journals, letters and diary excerpts coupled with artefacts and audio visual displays.

The project was initiated by the National Trust of Australia (WA) and completed in December 2014. Peninsula Farm continues to offer social, economic and environmental benefit to the community and is a popular attraction for Perth residents, education groups and tourists visiting this significant heritage site.


heritage tourism project


 Image of Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse

The Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse and Lighthouse Keeper’s Cottages were constructed in 1903, with the lighthouse remaining in continued operation to the present day. In 1986, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority established a small maritime museum and tourist bureau office in one of the keeper’s cottages, beginning a 29-year history of the site being open to visitors.

Experienced guides provide regular tours and the site features interpretive signage and a collection of maps, artefacts and photographs to help visitors interpret the sites extensive history.

Cape Naturaliste is an outstanding example of a heritage tourism destination that provides a window into the past technology, transport and the associated ways of life. As well as telling its own story, the lighthouse provides a starting point to explore whaling, shipwrecks and other stories significant to the region.

 Discovery Bay's Historic Whaling Station Discovery Bay's Historic Whaling Station

Discovery Bay's Historic Whaling Station in Albany was home to the Cheynes Beach Whaling Company between 1952 and 1978. It tells the story of commercial whaling and gives visitors an insight into what it was like to work there at the height of the whaling industry.

The Jaycees Community Foundation has transformed the whaling station into an internationally significant and multi-award winning regional heritage tourism destination. The station has attracted more than 2 million visitors and generated more than $40 million in the local economy.

For broad appeal, the project employs varying technologies and uses converted buildings and whale oil tanks, to innovatively present the history of Australia’s first industry. It is now part of a larger tourism precinct incorporating natural heritage.

 Image of the National Anzac Centre in Albany National Anzac Centre

The National Anzac Centre is a world-class visitor attraction set within Albany’s Heritage Park. The centre features high-quality museum content interpreted through a state-of-the-art range of engaging and immersive exhibits and displays.

The centre offers visitors a deeply personal connection with the Anzac legend and played an important role in last year’s Anzac Centenary Commemorations. The Anzac story is revealed through interactive, multimedia displays; unique artefacts; rare images and film; and audio commentary.

Within the first three months of opening, the centre attracted more than 25,000 visitors, many of whom had previously been unaware of the significance of the site. As Australia’s foremost museum dedicated solely to honouring the Anzacs of the First World War, the National Anzac Centre has reinforced and extended the recognition of Albany’s as a key heritage tourism destination.

 Image of walkers on the Rottnest Island Wadjemup Walk Trail Rottnest Island Wadjemup Walk Trail

The Rottnest Island Wadjemup Walk Trail project was born from the need to protect, conserve and raise awareness of both the environmental and cultural values of Rottnest Island, while meeting visitors’ needs. The trail network provides an exploratory narrative for visitors, connecting Rottnest’s beautiful natural features to its cultural history, in an environmentally-sustainable manner.

Incorporating interpretation into the trail design allows the diverse values of the island to be communicated, ensuring visitors continue to respect and protect its values.

The trail links all five State Registered heritage precincts on the island, allowing visitors a walk through Western Australian history, amid stunning scenery and the natural environment.


conservation or adaptive reuse of a state registered place


 Exterior view of the District Medical Officer's Quarters, now Dome Cafe Port Hedland
District Medical Officer's Quarters (fmr) (now Dôme Café Port Hedland)

Place Number: 2286
The vision for Dôme Port Hedland, through the restoration of the District Medical Officer’s Quarters, was to create a welcoming space where the community of Port Hedland and surrounding districts could meet and feel comfortable.

Through the restoration, a place that was once closed to the public and in a state of disrepair is now a thriving community hub which makes a valuable contribution to the town’s heritage tourism industry.

 Exterior view of the Duke's Inn (Colonial Hotel and Stables), Northam  Duke's Inn (Colonial Tavern and Stables), Northam

Place Number: 1855
In 2010, a conservation plan was developed for Duke’s Inn and the Stables by conservation architect Annabel Wills. The plan outlined recommended conservation and maintenance works, with a schedule for it to be done in three stages.

The most urgent task was to stabilise and reconstruct the collapsed stables. The conservation of the hotel, Duke’s Inn, then followed. Finally, in May 2013, the stables were adapted into accommodation that complemented the restored main hotel and recently built chalets.

The conservation work, which was completed in May 2014, has resulted in a design that not only respects the heritage of the place, but highlights and enhances its existing fabric.

 Exterior view of Harwood's Cottage and Cafe in Busselton Harwood's Cottage and Café, Busselton

Place Number: 3478
Harwood's Cottage and Café is a cluster of buildings representing the last vestige of the Quindalup town site, a satellite settlement for Busselton. From the mid to late 1800s, Quindalup was the hub of a thriving timber industry.

When Norma Andrews inherited the property in 1998, Harwood's Cottage (Slab Cottage Group), the collection of buildings was in a derelict state and in desperate need of repair. It had been her dream for more than 20 years to restore the buildings and open a cafe that served home-baked cakes.

Through her tireless, conscientious and dedicated approach, Ms Andrews has now restored the buildings and given them a new lease of life.

 McNess Royal Arcade facade McNess Royal Arcade facade restoration, Perth

Place Number: 1990
McNess Royal Arcade was built for wealthy scrap merchant, Sir Charles ‘Scruffy’ McNess. Completed in 1897, the arcade is a richly-ornamented example of the Federation Free Classical style designed by William Wolf, who later went on to design His Majesty’s Theatre.

McNess Royal Arcade façade restoration is the first phase of the broader conservation strategy by St Martins Property Group for the revitalisation of this heritage building in the heart of Perth’s CBD.

The facade restoration project returned this Perth landmark to its former glory by repairing the damaged stucco that was in a dangerous state of disrepair. By using the most up-to-date analytical techniques, combined with a thorough archival research, the building has been expertly restored and painted in a historically accurate colour palette.

 Interpretation at Old Port at Arthur Head Reserve in Fremantle Old Port at Arthur Head Reserve, Fremantle

Place Number: 896
Fremantle’s Old Port is located within the nationally-recognised heritage reserve of Arthur Head,  where the first European settlers landed on the west coast of Australia on 2 May 1829. Architect firm Donaldson and Warn was commissioned to rejuvenate the area by improving public amenity and foregrounding the location’s historical significance.

The formerly dilapidated site is now a popular space that provides greater public amenity. The overall design, including signage that speaks to the site’s history, highlights the heritage and cultural significance of the place.

The Old Port project has been recognised with an Australian Institute of Architects WA Chapter Urban Design Architecture Award and a City of Stirling Conservation or Restoration of Heritage Place Award.

 Exterior view of the Old Railway Station in Geraldton at night Old Railway Station, Geraldton

Place Number: 1068
Situated on the ocean front on Marine Terrace, Geraldton’s Original Railway Station is a cultural heritage icon of State significance. It was built in 1878 to house the first Government Railway Station in Western Australia. When the WA Museum moved out in 2000, the building remained unoccupied for 13 years and fell into a state disrepair.

The Original Railway Station restoration was a collaborative effort between the City of Greater Geraldton and Geraldton Building Services and Cabinets. Since restoration, a derelict building has been transformed into a thriving Visitor Centre, with its own al fresco café. It is now a community facility that can be enjoyed by residents and visitors to Geraldton. More importantly, the building has been safeguarded for the enjoyment of future generations.

 Image of Stirling Terrace enhancement
Stirling Terrace enhancement, Albany

Place Number: 14922
Stirling Terrace is one Albany’s most significant heritage assets, both as a streetscape and as a collection of Victorian and Federation period buildings. Over time, the terrace had become neglected and uninviting, with its sole purpose largely as a traffic thoroughfare.

Historically used as a hub for industry, commercial enterprise and civic engagement since the mid-19th century and with significant links to wartime, a project was instigated to conserve Stirling Terrace. The official opening was on 1 November 2014, the day of the Anzac Convoy Commemorative event. The enhancement has revitalised the civic heart of Albany, promoted building restoration and adaptive reuse and encouraged people to engage with the city and each other.

 Exterior view of Wanslea, now the Cancer Wellness Centre in Cottelsoe Wanslea - Cancer Wellness Centre, Cottesloe

Place Number: 598
Wanslea, now the Cancer Wellness Centre in Cottesloe, represents the successful conservation and refurbishment of a significant heritage building, allowing its continued use as accommodation for several community organisations.

The National Trust of Australia (WA) completed the project with primary funding from Lotterywest, a significant contribution by the Department of Education and other supporters. Bernard Seeber Architects led the design team, with building work undertaken by Colgan Industries Western Projects.

Wanslea represents an example of current best practice conservation methods, processes and procedures coming together and achieving a functional and economically sustainable outcome.










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Heritage is integral to the vibrant life and prosperity of Western Australia.
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Level 2, 491 Wellington Street, Perth WA 6000

PO Box 7479
Cloisters Square PO WA 6850

T: (08) 6552 4000
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F: (08) 6552 4001
info@stateheritage.wa.gov.au

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